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Beware Your Digital Blind Spot Guest post by Intellyx Principal Analyst Charles Araujo By now, every company in the world is on the lookout for the digital disruption that will threaten their existence. In study after study, executives believe that technology has either already disrupted their industry, is in the process of disrupting it or will disrupt it in the near future. As a result, every organization is taking steps to prepare for or mitigate unforeseen disruptions. Yet in almost every industry, the disruption trend continues unabated. Driven by a desire to get ahead of this trend, IT organizations are moving rapidly to adopt technologies and methodologies that will help them adapt, innovate and operate at greater organizational velocity. The widespread interest in and adoption of DevOps, microservices, containers, cloud, SD-WAN, low-code/no-code platforms a... (more)

It’s Time to Tear Down Silos for Agile Release Management | @DevOpsSummit #Agile #DevOps

It's Time to Tear Down Silos for Agile Release Management By Simon King To make sure we’re on the same page, let’s start by defining what we mean by a silo. “They are nothing more than barriers… between departments… causing people… to work against each other.” Patrick Lencioni in Silos, Politics, and Turf Wars Thanks to the work of Lencioni we have a good framework for understanding the differences in performance of small and large teams within complex organizations. The traditional structure of IT was based on functional areas grouped by specialization, typically for infrastructure towers, help desks, and app support. Fast forward to today’s modern IT organization and the groups have been organized to act as mini service providers – shared services offering technical services such as database and storage to business service teams such as sales automation and mark... (more)

What Are Containers? | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #Docker #Kubernetes

What Are Containers and What Do They Have to Do with End-User Experience? By Joe Michalowski End-user experience is everything when it comes to facilitating workplace productivity. You could deploy or develop the most powerful applications anyone has ever seen-but they won't do any good if they offer a poor experience. This is a major reason why applications are moving to SaaS, PaaS and IaaS cloud computing models. The cloud simplifies applications on the back end, which translates to smoother end-user experiences. But as cloud apps integrate more services and user bases diversify, IT has to do more to streamline application platforms. Enter container technology. What Are Containers? Few technologies ever explode in popularity the way containers did after Docker's 2013 release. Now, just about every player in cloud computing is releasing a container product. Containe... (more)

[slides] #DevOps and #Agile Organization | @DevOpsSummit @MThiele10 #CD

DevOps - The Symptom of an Agile Organization DevOps is all the rage these days and with good reason as it promises to reduce the time-to-market for new applications. It also promises to improve change management, allowing teams to deploy changes to their applications quickly and efficiently. However, DevOps isn't something you buy, install, or implement; rather it is the symptom of an appropriate organizational system. In his session at @DevOpsSummit New York, Mark Thiele, EVP, Data Center Technologies at SUPERNAP International, discussed how to get to the right organizational model that will allow DevOps practices to flourish. Download Slide Deck: ▸ Here Speaker Bio Mark Thiele's responsibilities at SUPERNAP include evaluating new data center technologies, developing new sites, identifying partners and providing industry thought leadership. His insights on the nex... (more)

Small Organizations and #DevOps | @DevOpsSummit #APM #CD #Monitoring

Ed was demoralized. He had just heard a speaker who would change his life. He knew he needed to change, and he knew what the end goal was. He just didn't know how to get there. He needed fresh air. He needed endorphins. What better way to do that than go on a 6-hour run through some of the seedier neighborhoods of Vegas to the edge of the desert. Ed Ruiz (@eruiz06) is the Senior Director of IT for the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH), and I heard him share lessons learned from his conversion to DevOps during the marathon All Day DevOps Conference (free, online). Here's where his journey started. Earlier that year, ASPPH recognized a need to modernize their membership structure. They had ballooned from 31 to 106 members. Ed had a staff of 10, supporting 54,000 students and 13,000 faculty serving in 141 countries. They were steeped in follo... (more)

Production Deployments | @CloudExpo @DaliborSiroky #APM #ML #DevOps

Production Deployments Don't Have to Be a High Wire Act By Dalibor Siroky It's 3 am in California, and you are still awake trying to sort through a release process that has been delayed by several hours. The deployment to the main application cluster took several extra hours due to an unanticipated problem with the servers, and now everyone is waiting on the lead database administrator to call into a conference bridge so you can all move on to Step 53.5b of the deployment. Your production deployments always seem to be problematic and this one might be the worst you've experienced yet. Everyone's Tired: Bad Decisions Abound By "everyone," I mean the 30 QA testers and 3 project managers in California, several developers in Sydney and India, and an operations team spread throughout the EU and the US. You can tell by some of the ambient noise on this conference call that... (more)

Capital One Presented at @DevOpsSummit New York | @TopoPal #DevOps

From Our Faculty Archives: @DevOpsSummit New York 2015 DevOps at Enterprise: Capital One Shifts Left In his session at DevOps Summit, Tapabrata Pal, Director of Enterprise Architecture at Capital One, told a story about how Capital One has embraced Agile and DevOps Security practices across the Enterprise - driven by Enterprise Architecture; bringing in Development, Operations and Information Security organizations together. Capital Ones DevOpsSec practice is based upon three "pillars" - Shift-Left, Automate Everything, Dashboard Everything. Within about three years, from 100% waterfall, Capital One now has 500+ Agile Teams delivering quality software via Agile and DevOps practices. Speaker Bio Tapabrata Pal has 20 years of IT experience in various technology roles (Developer, Operations Engineer and Architect) in the retail, healthcare and finance industries. Over... (more)

7 Spices of #ContinuousDelivery Pipeline | @DevOpsSummit #CD #DevOps

The Seven Spices of a Continuous Delivery Pipeline By Andreas Prins A Continuous Delivery pipeline as part of an Agile transformation is like spices in a meal. Without them, the food is bland and worthless. On the other hand, the right blend of spices will leave you craving more, stimulating your senses and energizing you. But as any good cook will tell you, it can be a bit difficult to find the exact right blend of spices for a specific dish. Salt and pepper are usually basic requirements, but knowing how to give your creation a boost by adding more complex spices, like turmeric, star anise, ginger or coriander, is a little trickier. It requires selecting the spices with care to make the dish tasteful—and that’s exactly like choosing tools for your CD pipeline and building your pipeline up. In short, creating a Continuous Delivery pipeline is not like using a standar... (more)

Scrum at 21 with @KSchwaber | @DevOpsSummit #Agile #AI #Scrum #DevOps

I'm told that it has been 21 years since Scrum became public when Jeff Sutherland and I presented it at an Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages & Applications (OOPSLA) workshop in Austin, TX, in October of 1995. Time sure does fly. Things mature. I'm still in the same building and at the same company where I first formulated Scrum.[1] Initially nobody knew of Scrum, yet it is now an open source body of knowledge translated into more than 30 languages.[2] People use Scrum worldwide for developing software and other uses I never anticipated.[3] Scrum was born and initially used by Jeff and me to meet market demand at our respective companies. After we made Scrum public in 1996 and writing my paper SCRUM Development Process, we started trying Scrum publicly, in companies with critical needs that were willing to try anything. The first organization where we e... (more)

Bad PR Might Sink #ArtificialIntelligence | @CloudExpo #BigData #AI #ML #DL

We've seen many buzzwordy innovations in technology over the last decade, from cloud computing to big data to microservices and beyond - but artificial intelligence (AI) by far has the most buzzword baggage. On the one hand, AI is perhaps the most revolutionary set of innovations since the transistor. But on the other, the bad press surrounding it continues to mount, perhaps even faster than the innovations themselves. We didn't suffer this kind of PR nightmare with the cloud, or the web, or even client/server. In fact, AI has an unprecedented set of PR challenges that threaten to sink the entire movement. AI vendors, from the burgeoning gaggle of AI startups all the way to IBM, are all crowded together at the eye of this hurricane. However, this PR storm impacts enterprises as well, as AI promises to change the role technology plays for every industry on this planet... (more)

Microservices Unplugged | @DevOpsSummit #IoT #DevOps #CD #Microservices

Given my (well-known and enduring) interest in all aspects of services, I have followed Martin Fowler's writing on microservices. But I will admit I always found the original paper more confusing than insightful. And in my client work I have resisted the temptation to use a microservices pattern, for precisely the reason that it would more than likely confuse. So I was interested to see the book Building Microservices by Sam Newman published last month, particularly as Newman is part of the Thoughtworks stable, which presumably means it is authoritative. Right off the bat, Newman advises that we should "think of microservices as a specific approach for SOA in the same way that XP or Scrum are specific approaches for Agile Software development". These analogies are very interesting because my expectation was that microservices is a pattern. So I might infer that micr... (more)